Posts Tagged ‘compost’

Vandana Shiva in Hawaiʻi

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Local food and sustainable agriculture enthusiasts are preparing for a highly anticipated visit from Dr. Vandana Shiva. From January 15-17, Dr. Shiva will speak to legislators, students, agricultural specialists and community members on O‘ahu and Kaua‘i about food justice and sustainable agriculture—issues that are gathering momentum as Hawai‘i attempts to address the question of its growing food insecurity.

There’s plenty of events planned. Please see the flyers above and below for all that’s going on. Also, visit Hawaii Seed for more detailed information on all events planned for Vandana Shiva’s visit.

It looks like all tickets to see Vandana Shiva speak at UH Manoa and the Salvation Army Ray Kroc Center in Kapolei are sold out. BUT, you can still catch her speak at the event at the HI State Capitol on Weds Jan. 16 9:30am-2pm.

You can also LISTEN LIVE to her speak at UH. Click HERE to get more info.

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Refinery Project Launch Event RECAP

If you would not be forgotten, As soon as you are dead and rotten, Either write things worth reading, Or do things worth writing.

— Benjamin Franklin

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This quote above from Ben Franklin speaks directly to that little engine burning hot at the core of my being that motivates me to do what I do every morning I wake up. This life is so temporary, and we need to live it to the fullest. We will all perish in the end. I believe life is about taking ACTION and DOING something. Anything is possible and there are no limitations, except those we place on ourselves. Dare to dream, and be even more daring by acting on those dreams.

One person doing just that is my friend Lan Thai. Lan is a chef, artist, creator and all around bad ass chick living up here on the North Shore of Oahu. She owns Happy’s Hawaii catering and is also co-founder, with Nick Wells (Two Crows Surfboards), of the Refinery Project (R/P). The R/P is an off-grid, creative collaborative space located inside the historic Waialua Sugar Mill on the North Shore. It’s build out of shipping containers and mostly re-used materials. Art and creativity run rampant throughout the space. As Lan describes it:

The Refinery Project takes the community to make it an awesome place and i hoped i have proven with the groundwork i’ve laid that i can really make this happen. This will be the best art space collaborative in the world. I will bridge art events from town to country. i will draw artists and creatives from all over the world. I will make it happen. This will be a prime Hawaii destination. The community will benefit from the awesome workshops and classes for all ages. Workshops including painting, music, cooking, gardening, homesteading, computers… just about everything but all in a collaborative and unique creative way to make learning fun.

Each One Teach One Farms is proud to be a partner in the R/P. We are helping out with the garden, implementing a Bokashi food waste recycling system and will be conducting classes and workshops there in the future.

This past weekend, the R/P held a launch party / fundraiser gala to raise funds for a solar system, shipping containers and other expansion supplies. There were over 100 people in attendance enjoying live art, music and amazing food. Thank you to everyone who came out to support and make this event a success.

If the Refinery Project is something you believe in, please make a donation. You can go visit the R/P Indiegogo Fundraiser Site to make a donation. We thank you.

Here are some pics from the event. All photos taken by Benjamin Pettus. You can view all photos from the event HERE.

The Honolulu Weekly also mentioned the R/P event in their latest issue. Go HERE to check it out.

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CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL IMAGES BY BENJAMIN PETTUS

New Video: Burying Your Bokashi Bucket Indoors?!

I made this quick video in response to a question I received via email from Sean in Hong Kong. He doesn’t have a yard to bury his Bokashi Bucket or an outdoor space to place a bin. Sean wanted to know about out burying the fermented food waste from his Bokashi Bucket inside his apartment using an enclosed bin. Check out the video to learn more!

Throw To Grow Hits $10k + Media Coverage

OMG! Throw To Grow has raised more than $10,000 as of just a few minutes ago. The pledges keep coming in.

Thank you so much to everyone who has pledged and gotten us to this point! We’re doing it!!

Throw To Grow has also gotten covered by some awesome newspapers, magazines and blogs. Check out some of our recent press:

THROW TO GROW ON FRANK 151 – Global cutting edge style and culture magazine, Frank151 from NYC covers Throw To Grow and the New Trash Revolution

EACH ONE TEACH ONE SEEKS FUNDS FOR FOOD WASTE RECYCLING PROJECT – Hawaii Business Magazine’s blog

THROW TO GROW BRINGS BOKASHI BUCKETS TO THE MASSES – Honolulu Pulse, powered by HI’s premier daily print newspaper, Honolulu Star Advertiser.

CLICK HERE to make your pledge and join the New Trash Revolution

Honolulu Pulse Covers Throw To Grow and Bokashi Buckets

Honolulu Pulse, powered by the Star Advertiser Newspaper just published a great article on our Throw To Grow fundraiser and Bokashi composting!

BY NINA WU / nwu@staradvertiser.com

Ever heard of a Bokashi Bucket?

North Shore resident Jim DiCarlo, 31, is hoping to get one in your hands and explain how it works as part of his Throw to Grow Project. It’s all part of his mission to change the way the world thinks about waste.

A Bokashi Bucket is basically an anaerobic composting system which transforms food into rich, gardening soil. You throw food scraps into the bucket, sprinkle with a special “Bokashi mix” (made up of wheat bran infused with microorganisms), seal a lid on tight, and eventually it will all ferment.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

View Throw To Grow on Kickstarter and pledge your donation to the New Trash Revolution!

Throw To Grow / Bokashi In The News!

Today, some photos were taken for an article on Bokashi composting and our Throw to Grow food waste recycling project for an upcoming article in the Honolulu Star Advertiser newspaper. Keep a look out here on the site for when the story is published.

This is Dennis Oda. He was the photog shooting for the Star Advertiser article today. Dennis has been shooting photos for the newspaper longer than I’ve been alive. He has seen it all and has got some stories to tell, to say the least. Dennis is a real OG and all around rad guy!

Don’t know about Throw to Grow? Well, Throw To Grow is the beginning of a new trash revolution. Throw To Grow is a food waste recycling pilot project being launched by E1T1 Farms in Hawaii that will implement the innovative Bokashi fermentation method on a large scale to rapidly recycle food waste into good soil in a clean and green way. We need your support to get started. We’re using KICKSTARTER to raise funds. Please watch the video below and go HERE to pledge your donation. We appreciate your support!

Please help E1T1 Farms Throw To Grow


Please CLICK HERE to visit Throw To Grow on KICKSTARTER and donate!

Aloha peeps!

Throw To Grow is a food waste recycling pilot project I intend to launch in Feb., for four months, that will utilize the Bokashi fermentation technology. Essentially, I have designed a scaled-up version of the Bokashi Bucket that can recycle food waste on a commercial level into nutrient-rich organic soil to support local, sustainable agriculture.

For this pilot project, I will be working with a handful of larger scale waste generators such as restaurants, schools and supermarkets on Oahu to recycle their food waste using our system. Food waste is a huge environmental problem. As a country, we generate 34 million tons and recycle less than 3% of it. Food waste is now the single largest component of waste in our overflowing landfills. When placed there it becomes extremely toxic to our air, land and waters. 

Bokashi fermentation is an extremely fast, efficient and practical way to recycle all food wastes (including meat & dairy) without any harm to the environment. I believe this is the answer to the problem!
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